Dulwich Picture Gallery II

RKD STUDIES

Studio of David Teniers II DPG614, DPG35



DPG614 – The Seven Corporal Works of Mercy


PROVENANCE
T. Avery; Professor C. D. Broad, Cambridge; his gift, 1946.1

REFERENCES
Smith 1829–42, iii (1831), pp. 256–60, nos 1–5 for various versions, excluding DPG614 (Related works, nos 1–5);2 Cat. 1953, p. 39 (David Teniers II);?Murray 1980a, p. 128 (Studio of David Teniers II; ‘David Ryckaert [Rijckaert] is a possibility’); Murray 1980b, p. 28; Beresford 1998, pp. 236–7 (Studio of Teniers); Jonker & Bergvelt 2016, pp. 263, 266; RKD, no. 290429: https://rkd.nl/en/explore/images/290429 (July 4, 2018).

EXHIBITION
London/Leeds 1947–53, no. 50 (A. Blunt).3

TECHNICAL NOTES
Three-member oak panel with butt joins and a pronounced convex warp. The grain of the panel runs horizontally and the verso edges are bevelled. The lower join has previously split from the right-hand edge, 38 cm into the panel; this was mended and retouched during the 1989–90 restoration. The split is now consolidated with PVA and has a supporting button on the back. Some frame damage has occurred around the edge of the panel and the ground appears to be starting to tent slightly in the roof and one of the barrels. The paint is thinly applied, and brush marks are visible in the lights and some of the shadows. There are numerous old retouchings, the majority of which were retained during the most recent treatment of the panel. Previous recorded treatment: 1988, vulnerable paint along join consolidated with beeswax, H. Glanville; 1989–90, cleaned, split in panel mended and retouched, refitted in frame, Area Museums Service for South Eastern England, A. Baxter.

RELATED WORKS4
1) (differences in architecture and figures) David Teniers II, The Seven Works of Mercy, signed David Teniers F., copper, 56.5 × 77 cm. Louvre, Paris, 1879 [1].5
1a) (in reverse) Print after no. 1: Jacques-Philippe Le Bas, Les Œuvres de miséricorde, 1747, etching and engraving, 502 × 623 mm. BM, London, 1850,0713.29 [2].6
1b) After David Teniers II, The Seven Works of Mercy. Present whereabouts unknown (J. Leger & Son, Brussels, Nov. 1932; photo RKD).
2) (almost the same composition as DPG614) David Teniers II, The Seven Works of Mercy, copper, 26 × 34 in. (68 × 87 cm). Private collection, UK.7
2a) (in reverse) Print after no. 2: Carl Weisbrod, The Seven Works of Mercy, etching and engraving, 174 × 213 mm, in Cabinet du Duc de Choiseul, no. 84. BM, London, 1858,0417.1185 [3].8
2b) (related to no. 2 and DPG614) David Teniers II, The Seven Works of Mercy, dimensions and support unknown. Present whereabouts unknown (Goldschmidt sale, Berlin, 27 Apr. 1909, lot 60; photo RKD).
2c) (related to no. 2 and DPG614) David Teniers II, The Seven Works of Mercy, panel, 66 × 91 cm, signed under barrel, dimensions and support unknown. Present whereabouts unknown (Wedewer; his sale, Lepke, Berlin, 2 Dec. 1913, lot 52; photo Witt).
2d) (related to no. 2 and DPG614; more men on the left, among them a cripple) After David Teniers II, The Seven Works of Mercy, dimensions and support unknown. Present whereabouts unknown (Photo G. Gluck, 1954; RKD).
And several more (RKD).
3) (in reverse) David Teniers II, The Seven Works of Mercy, signed and dated 1644, copper, 70 × 89 cm. Present whereabouts unknown (Steengracht sale, Georges Petit, Paris, 9 June 1913, lot 73, sold to Brame; Steengracht coll., The Hague, since 1793).9
4a) (differences in architecture, extra beggar in the middle, and a curtain added to the left) David Teniers II, The Seven Works of Mercy, signed, canvas, 78 × 108 cm. Present whereabouts unknown (probably Countess Bentinck etc. sale, Christie’s, 28 Nov. 1975, lot 71 (canvas, 75 × 103.5 cm; photo RKD); Fischer, Lucerne, 16–17 June 1972, lot 572 (as Brotschenkung, distribution of bread; photo RKD)).
4b) (without the extra beggar; differences in the architecture) David Teniers II, The Seven Works of Mercy, 70 × 90 cm. Karl Franz Klose collection, Wroclaw (Breslau) (formerly Count Brabeck; Count zu Stolberg-Stolberg, Söder (Hanover); photo RKD; probably Fischer, Lucerne, 24–28 Nov. 1970, lot 2435; photo RKD).
Other artists
5) David Teniers I, The Seven Works of Mercy, 1637, panel. Museum Wuyts-Van Campen and Baron Caroly, Lier.10
6) Frans Francken II, The Seven Works of Mercy, signed and dated D (n Jong) (the young) francis franck. INVENTOR ET f. Ao 1617, panel, 99 × 148 cm. Kunstmuseum, Basel, 1142 [4].11
7) Mattheus van Helmont, The Seven Works of Mercy, signed and dated M. V. Hellemont f 1650, canvas, 86.6 × 117 cm. Present whereabouts unknown (Sotheby’s, 7 July 1999, lot 503).12
8a) David Rijckaert III, Country Fair (or Farmers’ Joy), signed and dated Davide Ryckaert Fecit Antwerpiae C. 1649, canvas, 120 × 175 cm. KHM, Vienna, 729.13
8b) David Rijckaert III, Pillage (or Farmers’ Grief), signed and dated David Ryckaert Fecit Antwerpiae 1649, canvas, 121 × 177 cm. KHM, Vienna, 733.14
9) Master of Alkmaar, Polyptych with the Seven Works of Mercy, 1504, panel, 7 panels, each 101 × 54–55.5 cm. RM, Amsterdam, SK-A-2815.15
10a) (preparatory drawing) Pieter Bruegel I, Charity, signed and dated BRUEGEL 1559, pen and dark brown ink, 224 × 299 mm. On permanent loan to BvB, Rotterdam, N 18.16
10b) Philips Galle after Pieter Bruegel I, Charity, c. 1559, engraving, 224 × 289 mm. BM, London, 1873,0510.224.17
11) Pieter Brueghel II, The Seven Acts of Mercy, signed P.BREVGHEL, panel, 43.1 × 57.5 cm. Christie’s, 9 July 2003, lot 11.18
12) Pieter Aertsen, The Seven Acts of Mercy, dated 1573/29 ME, panel, 111.5 × 144.1 cm. Muzeum Narodowe, Warsaw, M.Ob.2183.19
13) Joost Cornelisz Droochsloot, The Seven Works of Mercy, monogrammed and dated Jco. fecit Ao 1618, canvas, 189 × 295 cm. Centraal Museum, Utrecht, 2528.20

DPG614
studio of David Teniers (II)
Seven Corporal Works of Mercy, c. 1642-1643
panel, oil paint 64,8 x 88,5 cm
Dulwich (London), Dulwich Picture Gallery, inv./cat.nr. DPG614

1
David Teniers (II)
The Seven Acts of Mercy, 1640s
copper, oil paint 56,5 x 77 cm
lower right : DAVID TENIERS F.
Paris, Musée du Louvre, inv./cat.nr. 1879

2
Jacques-Philippe Le Bas after David Teniers (II)
Seven Corporal Works of Mercy, dated 1747
paper, etching and engraving 503 x 623 mm
London (England), British Museum, inv./cat.nr. 1850,0713.29

3
Carl Weisbrod after David Teniers (II)
Seven Corporal Works of Mercy, c. 1770
paper, etching and engraving 174 x 213 mm
London (England), British Museum, inv./cat.nr. 1858,0417.1185

4
Frans Francken (II)
Seven Works of Mercy, dated 1617
panel, oil paint 99 x 148 cm
Basel (Switzerland), Kunstmuseum Basel, inv./cat.nr. 1142


There is no doubt about the artist essentially responsible for DPG614. David Teniers II and his studio produced more than twenty versions of this subject, and there are many later copies. Two ‘prime versions’ are very close in composition: the one in the Louvre (Related works, no. 1, on copper) [1] and a work in a British private collection (Related works, no. 2, also on copper). DPG614, on panel, is almost identical to the latter. There is a difference in colouring between nos 1 and 2, and the Louvre picture is a bit more freely painted and more colourful than DPG614. Other differences include the woman in the middle, who in the Louvre picture is young and in no. 2 and DPG614 is older; the buildings in the centre; and the presence in the Louvre picture of a window on the left with a girl looking out.

A Seven Works of Mercy by ‘David Teniers’ painted in 1643 is mentioned in a Utrecht inventory in 1646.21 That might have been David Teniers I, who died in 1649, but since only one crude picture with this subject is associated with him (Related works, no. 5) it is more than likely that the composition was by David Teniers II. According to Klinge in 1980 David Teniers II himself produced six compositions with this subject, of which five were already mentioned by Smith in 1831, with their provenances. Four were painted in the first half of the 1640s, of which one is dated 1644 (Related works, no. 3), the other two later. The Dulwich version probably dates from c. 1642–3.22

Both the Louvre and the no. 2/DPG614 versions were copied many times (e.g. Related works, nos 1b and 2b–2d), but none of the copies is signed or dated. There are two 18th-century prints in reverse, one after the Louvre composition (Related works, no. 1a) and one after no. 2, when it was in the collection of the Duc de Choiseul (Related works, no. 2a) [3]. At least one other ‘original’, dated 1644, last recorded at the Steengracht sale in 1913, is in reverse (Related works, no. 3). Some of the paintings in reverse are based on the print after the Louvre picture and not on the Steengracht picture, but many were definitely painted before the print was made in the 18th century. The Louvre picture has the best claim to being autograph. It has been suggested that DPG614 was painted by Mattheus van Helmont (1623–79/99; Related works, no. 7) or David Rijckaert III (1612–61; Related works, no. 8a, 8b), both working in Teniers’s studio.23 When the picture entered the Dulwich collection it had a false Teniers monogram, which was removed in 1947. However it includes a portrait of a young man depicted in the role of a benefactor who is possibly Teniers, which could mean that it was painted by Teniers himself.24

DPG614 is not the strongest of the many versions. In it two elements are combined: one is the foreground, where a group are busy with food and drink; the other is the middle zone and the background; they are loosely connected through the woman and child in the centre. With a table from which bread is being distributed on the left and travellers receiving shelter on the right, the scene evokes one of Frans Francken II’s versions of the subject, dated 1617 (Related works, no. 6) [4].

The subject, set in a Flemish village, is the Seven Corporal Works of Mercy. These are feeding the hungry (the old man providing bread), giving drink to the thirsty (the boy pouring a drink for the woman in the centre foreground), clothing the naked (handing a garment to the beggar, on the left), giving shelter to travellers or welcoming the stranger (figures with pilgrim staffs greeted by an innkeeper, on the right), visiting the sick (in the distance on the right), visiting the imprisoned (at the door of the castle tower, in the centre of the background), and burying the dead (in the distance on the far right, beyond the travellers entering the inn).

The theme comes from the Bible, Matthew 25:35–36; in the 3rd century burying the dead was added, based on Tobit 1:17–19. These are the Seven Corporal Works, as distinct from the Seven Spiritual Works of Mercy. While those were appropriate for clerics and members of religious orders,25 these could be carried out by every layman or woman who wanted to perform good deeds. In the 16th century lay involvement in the care of the poor and needy was necessary, and it increased, certainly in the Protestant North, where the churches and religious establishments that had performed those duties were abolished, and their tasks were taken on by secular individuals or municipal institutions.

The Corporal Works of Mercy were popular in art from the Middle Ages onwards.26 In 1504 the Master of Alkmaar (active c. 1490–1510) painted an altarpiece for the church of St Laurence, with seven separate paintings set in a single frame (Related works, no. 9). The first artist to combine the Seven Works in a single scene was Pieter Bruegel I, about 1560, in a drawing and a print (Related works, nos 10a, 10b). After that, painted versions were made by Pieter Brueghel II (1564–1638; Related works, no. 11) and by Pieter Aertsen (c. 1508–75) in 1573, who placed his Seven Works in a Renaissance architectural setting (Related works, no. 12). Probably inspired by Pieter Bruegel I rather than Aertsen, the Francken family developed the theme in a more ‘realistic’ way (Related works, no. 6) [4]; the earliest dated version is of 1608. There seems to have been a kind of competition between the Francken and Teniers ‘factories’, with the former generally taking the lead; but where the Teniers paintings always depict a crowd that is calm, thankful for what is offered to them, the Francken paintings show aggressive and desperate beggars.

The subject was apparently appealing in Utrecht: in the collection where the Teniers was mentioned in 1646, there was also a painting of the Seven Works of Mercy by Joost Cornelisz. Droochsloot (1586–1666).27 Droochsloot tended to use the same scheme for every event involving a crowd in a village or city setting, as in his Seven Acts of Mercy dated 1618 (Related works, no. 13).

DPG614
studio of David Teniers (II)
Seven Corporal Works of Mercy, c. 1642-1643
panel, oil paint 64,8 x 88,5 cm
Dulwich (London), Dulwich Picture Gallery, inv./cat.nr. DPG614

1
David Teniers (II)
The Seven Acts of Mercy, 1640s
copper, oil paint 56,5 x 77 cm
lower right : DAVID TENIERS F.
Paris, Musée du Louvre, inv./cat.nr. 1879

2
Jacques-Philippe Le Bas after David Teniers (II)
Seven Corporal Works of Mercy, dated 1747
paper, etching and engraving 503 x 623 mm
London (England), British Museum, inv./cat.nr. 1850,0713.29

4
Frans Francken (II)
Seven Works of Mercy, dated 1617
panel, oil paint 99 x 148 cm
Basel (Switzerland), Kunstmuseum Basel, inv./cat.nr. 1142


David Teniers II (?)
DPG35 – Cottage with Peasants playing Cards

17th century?; canvas, 27.5 × 37.5 cm


PROVENANCE
Insurance 1804, no. 119 or no. 120 (‘A Small Landscape - Teniers · £100’ or ‘Ditto - Ditto. £100’); Bourgeois Bequest, 1811; Britton 1813, p. 31, no. 323 (‘Unhung / no. 54, Landscape, figures at a Cottage Door C[anvas] Teniers’; 1'9" × 1'11").

REFERENCES
Cat. 1817;28 Haydon 1817, p. 321;29 Cat. 1820;30 Cat. 1830, p. 5, no. 52; Jameson 1842, ii, p. 451, no. 52 (Teniers); Denning 1858, no. 52 (David Teniers I); Denning 1859, no. 52; Sparkes 1876, p. 169, no. 52 (David Teniers I); Richter & Sparkes 1880, p. 159, no. 52 (‘under the influence of Teniers the Younger’); Richter & Sparkes 1892 and 1905, p. 8, no. 35; Cook 1914, p. 21, no. 35; Cook 1926, p. 21; Cat. 1953, p. 38 (David Teniers I); Murray 1980a, p. 127 (attributed to Teniers; ‘Formerly attributed to Teniers I, but probably an 18th-century pastiche’); Murray 1980b, p. 28; Beresford 1998, pp. 236–7 (‘Imitator of Teniers’); Jonker & Bergvelt 2016, pp. 264, 266 (David Teniers II?); RKD, no. 290430: https://rkd.nl/en/explore/images/290430 (July 5, 2018).

TECHNICAL NOTES
Medium plain-weave linen canvas lined onto fine similar, with a narrow batten attached to the top edge. There are various small, repaired damages to the support – including an L-shaped tear in the meadow above the stake – and some slight deformations to the canvas along the bottom edge. The ground is grey, and over this the paint appears worn and dim, with notable areas of abrasion in the main house and the figures. Some old retouchings can be observed in the sky, the foreground and around the edges of the painting. Previous recorded treatment: 1867, ‘revived’ and varnished; 1949–55, conserved, Dr Hell.

RELATED WORKS
1) Copy: Ralph Cockburn, A Landscape, c. 1816–20, aquatint, 129 x 181 mm (Cockburn 1830, no. 35), DPG [5].31.

The very poor condition of this painting – rubbed, and with most of the top layers lost – makes its appreciation difficult. In the early 19th century nobody doubted the attribution, and it was even selected by Cockburn to be reproduced in aquatint (Related works, no. 1) [5]. Murray in 1980 was the first to question it: he thought it was ‘probably an 18th-century pastiche’. In 1998 Beresford suggested that it was by an imitator. It seems however possible that DPG35 is essentially a real, but battered, Teniers. It contains many elements found in his œuvre, such as the placing of the figures and the inn on a slightly raised area in the foreground, and the stumpy doll-like bodies of the peasants. A very similar pointing figure appears on the right in The Seven Corporal Acts of Mercy, from Teniers’ studio (DPG614).

DPG35
attributed to David Teniers (II)
Cottage with Peasants Playing Cards
canvas, oil paint 27,5 x 37,5 cm
Dulwich (London), Dulwich Picture Gallery, inv./cat.nr. DPG35

5
Ralph Cockburn after David Teniers (II)
Landscape, 1816-1820
paper, aquatint 129 x 181 mm
Dulwich (London), Dulwich Picture Gallery



Notes

1 C. D. Broad was a philosopher and Fellow of Trinity College, Cambridge. He gave three other pictures to Dulwich (DPG615, 616, 617). He seems to have acquired the painting from his step-uncle, T. C. Avery. In the minutes of Dulwich College (22 Nov. 1945), when Professor Broad’s offer was being discussed, the pictures were said to have been ‘in his family for a long time’.

2 The compositions of two of the five pictures Smith mentions are not known. Smith 1829–42, vi (1835), pp. 256–8, no. 1: David Teniers II, The Seven Works of Mercy, copper, 1 ft 11 in. by 2 ft 6¾ in. (c. 58 × 76 cm); present whereabouts unknown (A. Baring 1831; Edward Gray; Buchanan, Talleyrand 1817; Le Brun 1809). Smith 1829–42, vi (1835), p. 260, no. 5: David Teniers II, The Seven Works of Mercy, canvas, 2 ft 3 in. by 2 ft 6¾ in. (c. 68.6 × 78.1 cm); present whereabouts unknown (Chevalier Erard in 1835; Duc de la Vallière 1781, 321 fs. 13 l.): ‘This picture is in every way greatly inferior to the others, and is evidently a production of age and debility.’

3 ‘Identical in composition and nearly identical in size with Smith no. 3, last recorded in Lord Gwydyr’s sale, 1829, but this version is said by Smith to be on copper’ (Related works, no. 2).

4 Smith gives an overview of the versions: see note 2 above.

5 Smith 1829–42, vi (1835), p. 258, no. 2. He adds: ‘etched in the small collection of Le Brun. A picture corresponding in size and description […] was sold in the collection of M. Schuylenburg, at the Hague, in 1735, 860 flo, 77 l.’ RKD, no. 102611: https://rkd.nl/en/explore/images/102611 (May 30, 2018); Joconde (25 Sept. 2012). Provenance: Victor-Amédée de Carignan (1610–1741), Paris; Louis XV, 1742; see also Brejon de Lavergnée, Foucart & Reynaud 1979, p. 136.

6 RKD, no. 290536: https://rkd.nl/en/explore/images/290536 (July 8, 2018); see also https://www.britishmuseum.org/collection/object/P_1850-0713-29 (May 25, 2020); Atwater 1989, pp. 1320–21, no. 1591. See also Klinge & Lüdke 2005, p. 333, no. 114 (Kupferstichkabinett, Karlsruhe, VI/2812). There was at least one more print made, in the same direction as the picture: see BM, London, 1856,0308.576 in the Galerie du Musée Napoléon (published c. 1804–15).

7 Based on Smith 1829–42, vi (1835), pp. 258–9, no. 3, and on Klinge 1980, p. 263, no. 196. Prov.: Lt Col. Sir John Dunnington-Jefferson (1884–1979); James Morrison; Thomas Baring, Stratton; sold [Nieuwenhuys] or bt in, £378 0s. at Lord Gwydyr’s sale, Christies’s, London, 9 May 1829, lot 75; Duc de Chabot 1787; Prince de Conti 1777; Choiseul 1772 (see print, Related works, no. 3a); Gaignat 1768.

8 RKD, no. 290537: https://rkd.nl/en/explore/images/290537 (July 8, 2018); see also https://www.britishmuseum.org/collection/object/P_1858-0417-1185 (May 20, 2020), where the printmaker is called Jacques-Philippe Le Bas (1707–83); according to Atwater (1989, pp. 1410–11, no. 1750) it is Carl Weisbrod (1743– c. 1806); Jonker & Bergvelt 2016, p. 263, fig. 8, under DPG614.

9 Smith 1829–42, vi (1835), pp. 259–60, no. 4; according to Smith ‘the chef-d’œuvre of the four’; see for provenance De Vries & Buvelot 2012, pp. 104–5, no. 75.

10 http://musea.lier.be/content.jsp?objectid=7729 (March 20, 2011, no longer visible). From the reproduction it looks like a crude blend of Joost Cornelisz. Droochsloot (figures) and David Teniers II (architecture), and bears no resemblance to the work of David Teniers I.

11 RKD, no. 290563: https://rkd.nl/en/explore/images/290563 (May 25, 2020); Härting 1989, pp. 55, 307–8, no. 271; Härting 1983, A200, fig. 81.

12 RKD, no. 63655: https://rkd.nl/en/explore/images/63655 (May 30, 2018); probably identical to RKD, no. 71721: https://rkd.nl/en/explore/images/71721 (May 30, 2018), Lempertz, Cologne, 25 Nov. 2000, lot 1167.

13 Van Haute 1999, pp. 112–13, no. A90.

14 ibid., pp. 113–14, no A91.

15 RKD, no. 20933: https://rkd.nl/en/explore/images/20933 (July 7, 2018); https://www.rijksmuseum.nl/en/collection/SK-A-2815/catalogue-entry (accessed Jan. 14, 2020).

16 RKD, no. 247943: https://rkd.nl/en/explore/images/247943 (July 7, 2018); Lebeer 1969, pp. 98–100.

17 RKD, no. 247961: https://rkd.nl/en/explore/images/247961 (July 7, 2018); see also https://www.britishmuseum.org/collection/search?keyword=1873,0510.224 (May 25, 2020); Lebeer 1969, pp. 98–100.

18 RKD, no. 115556: https://rkd.nl/en/explore/images/115556 (May 30, 2018).

19 RKD, no. 31987: https://rkd.nl/en/explore/images/31987 (May 30, 2018); Filedt Kok, Halsema-Kubes & Kloek 1986, pp. 407–8, no. 298 (J. C. H. Buis).

20 RKD, no. 6023: https://rkd.nl/en/explore/images/6023 (May 30, 2018); see also De Jonge 1952, pp. 34–5, no. 77; Haak 1984, p. 54, fig. 55; Helmus 1999, pp. 825–6, no. 176.

21 In the papers of Carel Martens, a 17th-century collector in Utrecht, who also owned a painting of a closely related subject by ‘Drooghsloot’ [probably Joost Cornelisz. Droochsloot]: op den 6 Augusti 1646 gekocht inde kermis tot Utr[echt] een stuck schilderij geschildert bij David Teniers, schilder tot antwerpen, bij hem gemaeckt a[nn]o 1643, zijnde de 7 bermharticheeden, in gelde daer voor betaelt g. 170-0- noch daertegens verruylt een stuck van drooghsloot synde een maeltijt van creupelen ende arme bedelaers g. [not filled in]’ (on 6 August 1646 at the Utrecht fair [I] purchased a picture painted by David Teniers, painter in Antwerp, made by him in 1643, being the Seven Works of Mercy, paid for that 170 guilders and moreover exchanged a piece by Drooghsloot being a meal of cripples and poor beggars […]’); Van Eikema Hommes 2012, p. 281. Also in Vlieghe 2011, pp. 20, 109, note 148.

22 Klinge 1980, p. 263, no. 196.

23 Rijckaert was suggested by Murray, Helmont in a RKD note. Gilles van Tilborgh was suggested by Fergus Hall in 2012 (all in DPG614 file); he even suggested that there was a monogram on the barrel (‘GTB’).

24 For Teniers self-portraits see David Teniers II, The Artist at Work, signed D. Teniers. f, 1635, Private collection (Klinge 1991, pp. 50–52, no. 11), and Sight, signed D. Teniers, one of the Five Senses in the Harold Samuel collection (Sutton 1992, pp. 200–206, no. 67). It is also possible that Teniers’ collaborators painted a portrait of their master.

25 See the overview in Bühren 1998, especially ch. 3, 1570–1600.

26 Muller 1985; Bühren 1998; Botana 2011.

27 See note 21 (Martens).

28 It is not clear which of the following three pictures by Teniers in Cat. 1817 is DPG35: p. 3, no. 10 (‘FIRST ROOM – South Side; Cottage and Figures; D. Teniers’); p. 4, no. 20 (‘FIRST ROOM – South Side; A Cottage, with Figures; D. Teniers’); or p. 4, no. 21 (‘FIRST ROOM – South Side; A Cottage, with Figures; D. Teniers’). The other possibilities are DPG33 and DPG52.

29 Again, it is not clear which of the pictures is DPG35: no. 10 (‘Cottage and Figures. Painted with great appearance of truth, and is an excellent little specimen of the master’); no. 20 (‘Cottage with Figures’); no. 21 (‘Ditto’). The other possibilities are DPG33 and DPG52. On the same page Haydon comments on nos 17 (DPG49), 19 (DPG146), 20 (DPG33), and 21 (DPG35 or DPG52): ‘The foregoing five little pictures are exquisite examples of truth of colouring, drawing, and composition.’

30 Yet again, it is not clear which of three pictures by Teniers is DPG35: p. 3, no. 10 (Cottage and Figures; D. Teniers); p. 4, no. 20 (A Cottage, with Figures; D. Teniers); or p. 4, no. 21 (A Cottage, with Figures; D. Teniers). The other possibilities are DPG33 and DPG52.

31 RKD, no. 290514: https://rkd.nl/en/explore/images/290514 (July 8, 2018)

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